Ongoing research about trauma is helping me to understand that our brains store traumatic images differently than they store ordinary memories. Traumatic memories are stored in disconnected fragments instead of coherent stories. 
That may be because all of those details in one place would be too overwhelming to manage. That is also part of the reson those traumatic memories are so hard to "just let go." 

It's as if you wanted to assemble a jigsaw puzzle, but some of the pieces are in a kitchen drawer while others are under your pillow and most of the others are in a box in the closet.

Before I had Logosynthesis® as a tool, I thought it was necessary to assemble all the pieces of the trauma to let it go. Then I learned how to help a client release a single important piece of the stored traumatic memory. Amazingly, once this was done, the rest of the assembly job became unnecessary.

This paragraph is a comment I wrote about a passage on page 45-48 of Letting It Go: Relieve Anxiety and Toxic Stress in Just a Few Minutes Using Only Words (Rapid Relief with Logosynthesis®.)

You can see the passage in the book. You can also see the excerpt here. This link will take you to Bublish.com where I regularly publish comments on parts of this book. This is a site where authors share of their work. You can subscribe to my musings, there, as well as to the musings of many other authors. It’s a great place to learn about new books and I recommend that you visit.